OMAN-CORONAVIRUS-MERS-CoV-Outbreak-UPDATE

06 MARCH 2019

DE FAAKTO OUTBREAK INTELLIGENCE

UPDATE-OMAN

Middle–East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus

  • Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS‐CoV) -first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012
  • Since identified, 2,357 cases have been reported with at least 820 of them fatal (WHO, 2019)
  • Coronaviruses cause diseases ranging from the common cold to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
  • MERS symptoms include fever, cough and shortness of breath-Pneumonia is common, but not always present-Gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhoea, have also been reported
  • 35% of reported patients with MERS-CoV infection have died

 

OMAN-Ministry of Health Sultanate of Oman Via World Health Organization 

18 February 2019-International Health Regulations (IHR) National Focal Point of Oman

  • 8 new cases of MERS-CoV
  • 2 new deaths
  • 7 of the 8 cases appear to be secondary cases resulting from human-to-human transmission
  • 1 patient suspected of direct contact with dromedary camels

 

  • MERS-CoV has emerged in Eastern Mediterranean Region (Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Oman and the United Arab Emirates) making MERS one of the biggest health security threats in the Region

 

 

World Health Organization Risk Assessment

Infection prevention and control measures are critical to prevent the possible spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities.

Infection with MERS-CoV can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality. Humans are infected with MERS-CoV from direct or indirect contact with dromedary camels. MERS-CoV has demonstrated the ability to transmit between humans. So far, the observed non-sustained human-to-human transmission has occurred mainly in health care settings.

MERS-CoV appears to cause more severe disease in people with diabetes, renal failure, chronic lung disease, and immunocompromised persons. Therefore, these people should avoid close contact with animals, particularly camels, when visiting farms, markets, or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. General hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals and avoiding contact with sick animals, should be adhered to. Food hygiene practices should be observed. People should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating meat that has not been properly cooked.  (WHO, 2019)

 

Healthcare Workers Precautions

Healthcare workers should always apply standard precautions consistently with all patients, regardless of their diagnosis. Droplet precautions should be added to the standard precautions when providing care to patients with symptoms of acute respiratory infection; contact precautions and eye protection should be added when caring for probable or confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection; airborne precautions should be applied when performing aerosol generating procedures. (WHO, 2019)

WHO MERS-CoV OMAN https://www.who.int/csr/don/04-march-2019-mers-oman/en/

For more information-World Health Organization-MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus 

https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/middle-east-respiratory-syndrome-coronavirus-(mers-cov)

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________

 

12 FEBRUARY 2019

DE FAAKTO OUTBREAK INTELLIGENCE

Middle–East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus

OMAN-Ministry of Health Sultanate of Oman Via World Health Organization 

31 January 2019-International Health Regulations (IHR) National Focal Point of Oman

  • 5 new cases of MERS-CoV
  • 2 deaths
  • All 5 are laboratory confirmed cases
  • 4 of the 5 cases appear to be secondary cases resulting from human-to-human transmission
  • No direct contact with dromedary camels, however patients resided on a farm where dromedary camels and other animals were kept
  • The Ministry of Agriculture is testing the dromedary camels

 

  • MERS-CoV has emerged in Eastern Mediterranean Region (Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Oman and the United Arab Emirates) making MERS one of the biggest health security threats in the Region

 

MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus

  • Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS‐CoV) that was first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012
  • Since first identified, 2,311 cases have been reported with ~811 of them fatal

 

World Health Organization Risk Assessment

Infection prevention and control measures are critical to prevent the possible spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities.

Infection with MERS-CoV can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality. Humans are infected with MERS-CoV from direct or indirect contact with dromedary camels. MERS-CoV has demonstrated the ability to transmit between humans. So far, the observed non-sustained human-to-human transmission has occurred mainly in health care settings.

MERS-CoV appears to cause more severe disease in people with diabetes, renal failure, chronic lung disease, and immunocompromised persons. Therefore, these people should avoid close contact with animals, particularly camels, when visiting farms, markets, or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. General hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals and avoiding contact with sick animals, should be adhered to. Food hygiene practices should be observed. People should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating meat that has not been properly cooked.  (WHO, 2019)

 

Healthcare Workers Precautions

Healthcare workers should always apply standard precautions consistently with all patients, regardless of their diagnosis. Droplet precautions should be added to the standard precautions when providing care to patients with symptoms of acute respiratory infection; contact precautions and eye protection should be added when caring for probable or confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection; airborne precautions should be applied when performing aerosol generating procedures. (WHO, 2019)

WHO MERS-CoV OMAN  https://www.who.int/csr/don/11-february-2019-mers-oman/en/

For more information-World Health Organization-MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus 

https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/middle-east-respiratory-syndrome-coronavirus-(mers-cov)

_____________________________________________________________________________________

De Faakto Intelligence Research Observatory

29 January 2019

OUTBREAK INTELLIGENCE

Middle–East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus

OMAN-Ministry of Health Sultanate of Oman

  • New MERS Cases Detected
  • Four new cases of Middle–East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus have been detected in the Sultanate of Oman
  • The total number of registered cases from various Governorate of the Sultanate since 2013 reached 18 cases
  • The ministry affirms its continued effort to monitor and control the disease through the effective Epidemiological Surveillance System
  • All hospitals are capable of dealing with such cases
  • Saudi Arabia & The Saudi Ministry of Health which borders Oman is dealing with a similar ongoing outbreak http://defaakto.com/2018/10/05/outbreak-coronavirus-saudi-arabia/

 

Ministry of Health Sultanate of Oman  https://www.moh.gov.om/en/-/—951

 

  • MERS-CoV has emerged in Eastern Mediterranean Region (Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Oman and the United Arab Emirates) making MERS one of the biggest health security threats in the Region

 

MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus

  • Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS‐CoV) that was first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012
  • Since first identified, 2,278 cases have been reported with at least 806 of them fatal

 

World Health Organization Risk Assessment

Infection prevention and control measures are critical to prevent the possible spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities.

Infection with MERS-CoV can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality. Humans are infected with MERS-CoV from direct or indirect contact with dromedary camels. MERS-CoV has demonstrated the ability to transmit between humans. So far, the observed non-sustained human-to-human transmission has occurred mainly in health care settings.

MERS-CoV appears to cause more severe disease in people with diabetes, renal failure, chronic lung disease, and immunocompromised persons. Therefore, these people should avoid close contact with animals, particularly camels, when visiting farms, markets, or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. General hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals and avoiding contact with sick animals, should be adhered to. Food hygiene practices should be observed. People should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating meat that has not been properly cooked.  (WHO, 2019)

 

Healthcare Workers Precautions

Healthcare workers should always apply standard precautions consistently with all patients, regardless of their diagnosis. Droplet precautions should be added to the standard precautions when providing care to patients with symptoms of acute respiratory infection; contact precautions and eye protection should be added when caring for probable or confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection; airborne precautions should be applied when performing aerosol generating procedures. (WHO, 2019)

For more information-World Health Organization-MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus 

https://www.who.int/csr/don/16-january-2019-mers-saudi-arabia/en/