UPDATE-Outbreak Coronavirus-MERS-CoV-Saudi Arabia

12 February 2019

UPDATE

DE FAAKTO OUTBREAK INTELLIGENCE

Saudi Arabia-The Saudi Ministry of Health is reporting,

MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus

  • Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS‐CoV) that was first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012
  • Since first identified, 2,311 cases have been reported with at least ~811 of them fatal

 

UPDATE-12 February 2019 Saudi MOH (Epi-Week 7 & part of week 6)

  • 23 newly confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection reported from Saudi Arabia
  • 10 cases are classified Primary community acquired
  • 13 cases are classified Secondary community acquired
  • 19 patients negative for contact with camels
  • 4 patients positive for contact with camels
  • 1 new death

Saudi Ministry of Health  https://moh.gov.sa/en/CCC/events/national/Pages/2019.aspx

World Health Organization Risk Assessment

Infection prevention and control measures are critical to prevent the possible spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities.

Infection with MERS-CoV can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality. Humans are infected with MERS-CoV from direct or indirect contact with dromedary camels. MERS-CoV has demonstrated the ability to transmit between humans. So far, the observed non-sustained human-to-human transmission has occurred mainly in health care settings.

MERS-CoV appears to cause more severe disease in people with diabetes, renal failure, chronic lung disease, and immunocompromised persons. Therefore, these people should avoid close contact with animals, particularly camels, when visiting farms, markets, or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. General hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals and avoiding contact with sick animals, should be adhered to. Food hygiene practices should be observed. People should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating meat that has not been properly cooked.  (WHO, 2019)

 

Healthcare Workers Precautions

Healthcare workers should always apply standard precautions consistently with all patients, regardless of their diagnosis. Droplet precautions should be added to the standard precautions when providing care to patients with symptoms of acute respiratory infection; contact precautions and eye protection should be added when caring for probable or confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection; airborne precautions should be applied when performing aerosol generating procedures. (WHO, 2019)

For more information-World Health Organization-MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus 

https://www.who.int/csr/don/16-january-2019-mers-saudi-arabia/en/

________________________________________________________________________________________

DE FAAKTO OUTBREAK INTELLIGENCE

UPDATE 07 February 2019

OUTBREAK INTELLIGENCE

Saudi Arabia-The Saudi Ministry of Health is reporting,

MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus

  • Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS‐CoV) that was first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012
  • Since first identified, 2,278 cases have been reported with at least 806 of them fatal

 

UPDATE-07 February 2019 Saudi MOH

  • 11 newly confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection reported from Saudi Arabia
  • 2 cases are classified Primary community acquired
  • 9 cases are classified Secondary community acquired
  • 8 patients negative for contact with camels
  • 3 patient positive for contact with camels
  • No new deaths

Saudi Ministry of Health  https://moh.gov.sa/en/CCC/events/national/Pages/2019.aspx

 

World Health Organization Risk Assessment

Infection prevention and control measures are critical to prevent the possible spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities.

Infection with MERS-CoV can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality. Humans are infected with MERS-CoV from direct or indirect contact with dromedary camels. MERS-CoV has demonstrated the ability to transmit between humans. So far, the observed non-sustained human-to-human transmission has occurred mainly in health care settings.

MERS-CoV appears to cause more severe disease in people with diabetes, renal failure, chronic lung disease, and immunocompromised persons. Therefore, these people should avoid close contact with animals, particularly camels, when visiting farms, markets, or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. General hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals and avoiding contact with sick animals, should be adhered to. Food hygiene practices should be observed. People should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating meat that has not been properly cooked.  (WHO, 2019)

 

Healthcare Workers Precautions

Healthcare workers should always apply standard precautions consistently with all patients, regardless of their diagnosis. Droplet precautions should be added to the standard precautions when providing care to patients with symptoms of acute respiratory infection; contact precautions and eye protection should be added when caring for probable or confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection; airborne precautions should be applied when performing aerosol generating procedures. (WHO, 2019)

For more information-World Health Organization-MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus 

https://www.who.int/csr/don/16-january-2019-mers-saudi-arabia/en/

_________________________________________________________________________________________

 

DE FAAKTO OUTBREAK INTELLIGENCE

UPDATE 02 February 2019

OUTBREAK INTELLIGENCE

Saudi Arabia-The Saudi Ministry of Health is reporting,

MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus

  • Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS‐CoV) that was first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012
  • Since first identified, 2,278 cases have been reported with at least 806 of them fatal

 

UPDATE-02 February 2019 Saudi MOH

  • 5 newly confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection reported from Saudi Arabia
  • 2 cases are classified Primary community acquired
  • 3 cases are classified Secondary community acquired
  • 4 patients negative for contact with camels
  • 1 patient positive for contact with camels
  • No new deaths

Saudi Ministry of Health  https://moh.gov.sa/en/CCC/events/national/Pages/2019.aspx

 

World Health Organization Risk Assessment

Infection prevention and control measures are critical to prevent the possible spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities.

Infection with MERS-CoV can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality. Humans are infected with MERS-CoV from direct or indirect contact with dromedary camels. MERS-CoV has demonstrated the ability to transmit between humans. So far, the observed non-sustained human-to-human transmission has occurred mainly in health care settings.

MERS-CoV appears to cause more severe disease in people with diabetes, renal failure, chronic lung disease, and immunocompromised persons. Therefore, these people should avoid close contact with animals, particularly camels, when visiting farms, markets, or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. General hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals and avoiding contact with sick animals, should be adhered to. Food hygiene practices should be observed. People should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating meat that has not been properly cooked.  (WHO, 2019)

 

Healthcare Workers Precautions

Healthcare workers should always apply standard precautions consistently with all patients, regardless of their diagnosis. Droplet precautions should be added to the standard precautions when providing care to patients with symptoms of acute respiratory infection; contact precautions and eye protection should be added when caring for probable or confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection; airborne precautions should be applied when performing aerosol generating procedures. (WHO, 2019)

For more information-World Health Organization-MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus 

https://www.who.int/csr/don/16-january-2019-mers-saudi-arabia/en/

_________________________________________________________________________________________

De Faakto Outbreak Intelligence

UPDATE 30 January 2019

OUTBREAK INTELLIGENCE

The Saudi Ministry of Health is reporting,

MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus

  • Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS‐CoV) that was first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012
  • Since first identified, 2,278 cases have been reported with at least 806 of them fatal

 

UPDATE-29 January 2019 Saudi MOH

  • 2 newly confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection reported from Saudi Arabia
  • 2 new deaths
  • All cases are classified Primary community acquired
  • No contact with camels

Saudi Ministry of Health  https://moh.gov.sa/en/CCC/events/national/Pages/2019.aspx

 

World Health Organization Risk Assessment

Infection prevention and control measures are critical to prevent the possible spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities.

Infection with MERS-CoV can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality. Humans are infected with MERS-CoV from direct or indirect contact with dromedary camels. MERS-CoV has demonstrated the ability to transmit between humans. So far, the observed non-sustained human-to-human transmission has occurred mainly in health care settings.

MERS-CoV appears to cause more severe disease in people with diabetes, renal failure, chronic lung disease, and immunocompromised persons. Therefore, these people should avoid close contact with animals, particularly camels, when visiting farms, markets, or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. General hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals and avoiding contact with sick animals, should be adhered to. Food hygiene practices should be observed. People should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating meat that has not been properly cooked.  (WHO, 2019)

 

Healthcare Workers Precautions

Healthcare workers should always apply standard precautions consistently with all patients, regardless of their diagnosis. Droplet precautions should be added to the standard precautions when providing care to patients with symptoms of acute respiratory infection; contact precautions and eye protection should be added when caring for probable or confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection; airborne precautions should be applied when performing aerosol generating procedures. (WHO, 2019)

For more information-World Health Organization-MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus 

https://www.who.int/csr/don/16-january-2019-mers-saudi-arabia/en/

_______________________________________________________________________________________

De Faakto Outbreak Intelligence

UPDATE 26 January 2019

Outbreak Intelligence

The Saudi Ministry of Health is reporting,

MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus

  • Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS‐CoV) that was first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012
  • Since first identified, 2,278 cases have been reported with at least 806 of them fatal

 

UPDATE-21 January 2019 Saudi MOH

  • 3 newly confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection reported from Saudi Arabia
  • All cases are classified Primary community acquired
  • No contact with camels

Saudi Ministry of Health   https://moh.gov.sa/en/CCC/events/national/Documents/Epiwk4-19.pdf

 

World Health Organization Risk Assessment

Infection prevention and control measures are critical to prevent the possible spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities.

Infection with MERS-CoV can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality. Humans are infected with MERS-CoV from direct or indirect contact with dromedary camels. MERS-CoV has demonstrated the ability to transmit between humans. So far, the observed non-sustained human-to-human transmission has occurred mainly in health care settings.

MERS-CoV appears to cause more severe disease in people with diabetes, renal failure, chronic lung disease, and immunocompromised persons. Therefore, these people should avoid close contact with animals, particularly camels, when visiting farms, markets, or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. General hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals and avoiding contact with sick animals, should be adhered to. Food hygiene practices should be observed. People should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating meat that has not been properly cooked.  (WHO, 2019)

 

Healthcare Workers Precautions

Healthcare workers should always apply standard precautions consistently with all patients, regardless of their diagnosis. Droplet precautions should be added to the standard precautions when providing care to patients with symptoms of acute respiratory infection; contact precautions and eye protection should be added when caring for probable or confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection; airborne precautions should be applied when performing aerosol generating procedures. (WHO, 2019)

For more information-World Health Organization-MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus 

https://www.who.int/csr/don/16-january-2019-mers-saudi-arabia/en/

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________

UPDATE 17 January 2019

Outbreak Intelligence

MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus

  • Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS‐CoV) that was first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012
  • Since first identified, 2,278 cases have been reported with at least 806 of them fatal

 

  • From 1 December 2018 through 31 December 2018-Saudi Arabia reported five additional cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection
  • No new deaths are being reported
  • It is not always possible to identify patients with MERS-CoV early because like other respiratory infections, the early symptoms of MERS-CoV are non-specific (WHO, 2019)

 

World Health Organization Risk Assessment

Infection prevention and control measures are critical to prevent the possible spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities.

Infection with MERS-CoV can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality. Humans are infected with MERS-CoV from direct or indirect contact with dromedary camels. MERS-CoV has demonstrated the ability to transmit between humans. So far, the observed non-sustained human-to-human transmission has occurred mainly in health care settings.

MERS-CoV appears to cause more severe disease in people with diabetes, renal failure, chronic lung disease, and immunocompromised persons. Therefore, these people should avoid close contact with animals, particularly camels, when visiting farms, markets, or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. General hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals and avoiding contact with sick animals, should be adhered to. Food hygiene practices should be observed. People should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating meat that has not been properly cooked.  (WHO, 2019)

 

Healthcare Workers Precautions

Healthcare workers should always apply standard precautions consistently with all patients, regardless of their diagnosis. Droplet precautions should be added to the standard precautions when providing care to patients with symptoms of acute respiratory infection; contact precautions and eye protection should be added when caring for probable or confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection; airborne precautions should be applied when performing aerosol generating procedures. (WHO, 2019)

For more information-World Health Organization-MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus 

https://www.who.int/csr/don/16-january-2019-mers-saudi-arabia/en/

_________________________________________________

UPDATE  28 December 2018

Outbreak Intelligence

MERS-CoV Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus 

  • From 31 October through 30 November 2018-Saudi Arabia reported eight additional cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection, including two deaths
  • Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS‐CoV) that was first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012
  • Since first identified, 2,278 cases have been reported with at least 806 of them fatal

 

WHO risk assessment

Infection with MERS-CoV can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality. Humans are infected with MERS-CoV from direct or indirect contact with dromedary camels. MERS-CoV has demonstrated the ability to transmit between humans. So far, the observed non-sustained human-to-human transmission has occurred mainly in health care settings.

MERS-CoV appears to cause more severe disease in people with diabetes, renal failure, chronic lung disease, and immunocompromised persons. Therefore, these people should avoid close contact with animals, particularly camels, when visiting farms, markets, or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. General hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals and avoiding contact with sick animals, should be adhered to. Food hygiene practices should be observed. People should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating meat that has not been properly cooked. 

WHO MERS-CoV information,

https://www.who.int/csr/don/28-december-2018-mers-saudi-arabia/en/

________________________________________________________________________________________

UPDATE 16 December 2018

Outbreak Intelligence
Report from Outbreak News Today,

For the third time this week, the Saudi Arabia Ministry of Health has reported a patient ill with Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).

The most recent case is a 53-year-old man who is hospitalized from Riyadh.

Health officials note he had contact with camels.

http://outbreaknewstoday.com/riyadh-man-3rd-mers-case-reported-week-62312/

WHO risk assessment

Infection with MERS-CoV can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality. Humans are infected with MERS-CoV from direct or indirect contact with dromedary camels. MERS-CoV has demonstrated the ability to transmit between humans. So far, the observed non-sustained human-to-human transmission has occurred mainly in health care settings.

MERS-CoV appears to cause more severe disease in people with diabetes, renal failure, chronic lung disease, and immunocompromised persons. Therefore, these people should avoid close contact with animals, particularly camels, when visiting farms, markets, or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. General hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals and avoiding contact with sick animals, should be adhered to. Food hygiene practices should be observed. People should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating meat that has not been properly cooked. 

WHO-MER-CoV information,

https://www.who.int/emergencies/mers-cov/en/

________________________________________________________________________________________

Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS‐CoV) that was first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012.

Since first identified, 2,278 cases have been reported with at least 806 of them fatal.

UPDATE 20 November 2018-World Health Organization

From 16 through 30 October 2018, the International Health Regulations (IHR 2005) National Focal Point of Saudi Arabia reported four additional cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection, including one death.

From 2012 through 30 October 2018, the total global number of laboratory-confirmed MERS-CoV cases reported to WHO under IHR (2005) is 2266 with 804 associated deaths. The total number of deaths includes the deaths that WHO is aware of to date through follow-up with affected member states.

WHO risk assessment

Infection with MERS-CoV can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality. Humans are infected with MERS-CoV from direct or indirect contact with dromedary camels. MERS-CoV has demonstrated the ability to transmit between humans. So far, the observed non-sustained human-to-human transmission has occurred mainly in health care settings.

MERS-CoV appears to cause more severe disease in people with diabetes, renal failure, chronic lung disease, and immunocompromised persons. Therefore, these people should avoid close contact with animals, particularly camels, when visiting farms, markets, or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. General hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals and avoiding contact with sick animals, should be adhered to. Food hygiene practices should be observed. People should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating meat that has not been properly cooked. 

Full details from WHO,

http://www.who.int/csr/don/20-november-2018-mers-saudi-arabia/en/

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________

UPDATE 02 November 2018-World Health Organization

From 17 September through 15 October 2018, the International Health Regulations (IHR 2005) National Focal Point of Saudi Arabia reported eight additional cases of MERS-CoV infection, including three deaths. Of the eight cases reported, three were hospital contacts from one hospital in Dammam and two were household contacts in Riyadh.

Infection with MERS-CoV can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality. Humans are infected with MERS-CoV from direct or indirect contact with dromedary camels. MERS-CoV has demonstrated the ability to transmit between humans. So far, the observed non-sustained human-to-human transmission has occurred mainly in health care settings.

See WHO for latest details,

http://www.who.int/csr/don/01-november-2018-mers-saudi-arabia/en/

 

WHO is reporting Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) – Saudi Arabia
Disease outbreak news
3 October 2018

http://www.who.int/csr/don/03-october-2018-mers-saudi-arabia/en/

 

 

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